Zolochiv

Image - Zolochiv: St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church (1726-33). Image - Zolochiv: Interior of the Church of the Resurrection (1604).

Zolochiv [Zoločiv]. Map: IV-5. A city (2001 pop 23,481) on the Zolochivka River and a raion center in Lviv oblast. It is first mentioned in a document in 1442. By the end of the 15th century it was an important trade center in western Podilia, and in 1523 it obtained the rights of Magdeburg law. The town was protected with a castle and walls. In 1672 it was captured by the Turks and burned to the ground. After the partition of Poland in 1772, it was annexed by Austria, and served as a county center in Galicia. In the interwar period (1919–39) it was occupied by Poland. Today it is an industrial center with a branch of the Maiak Sewing Consortium, a carton and furniture factory, a radio factory, and a sugar refinery. Its chief architectural monuments are the 16th-century castle (rebuilt in 1634–6), the Church of the Resurrection (1604), Saint Nicholas's Church (end of the 16th century, reconstructed in 1767), and a Roman Catholic Church of the Virgin Mary (1726–33).

[This article originally appeared in the Encyclopedia of Ukraine, vol. 5 (1993).]


Image - Zolochiv: Church of the Resurrection (1604). Image - Zolochiv castle (16th century; rebuilt in 1634-6): main palace building. Image - Zolochiv castle (16th century; rebuilt in 1634-6): inner courtyard with the Chinese palace. Image - Zolochiv castle (16th century; rebuilt in 1634-6). Image - Zolochiv castle (16th century; rebuilt in 1634-6): fortification walls. Image - Zolochiv castle (16th century; rebuilt in 1634-6): main gate.


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